Review of ‘The Triple Knife and Other Doctor Who Stories’ by Jenny T. Colgan

The Triple Knife is one of two Doctor Who paperbacks released under the new brand. They’re not featuring the forthcoming new Doctor, of course – that would be giving too much away ahead of the new series – but they are both by prominent female writers in promotion of Doctor Who’s Year of the Woman. Written by Jenny T. Colgan, The Triple Knife is a collection of short stories either starring or told from the perspective of a significant female character from the recent years of Doctor Who. There are five stories of varying lengths in this collection: the story … Continue reading Review of ‘The Triple Knife and Other Doctor Who Stories’ by Jenny T. Colgan

100% Cotton*: The Target Novelisations of Donald Cotton

A classic feature from the archives of Strange Skins 2013. Donald Cotton, an acclaimed TV and radio writer and co-creator of Adam Adamant Lives, only ever wrote two stories for Doctor Who… and neither of them is particularly acclaimed. His first, The Myth Makers, is often overlooked because it is one of those sad cases where 100% of the footage is missing from the BBC archive. Not even so much as a tiny clip exists! His second (and, as it turned out, final) script, The Gunfighters, exists in its entirety, but for a long time was unfairly (and rather inaccurately) … Continue reading 100% Cotton*: The Target Novelisations of Donald Cotton

Doctor Who Magazine Special: The World of Fandom

Fans of Doctor Who fan videos (too much use of the word fan in that phrase, probably) should check out the latest Doctor Who Magazine special, The World of Fandom, which has got a great feature about those lovely home-made slices of Doctor Who. There’s lots of other cool stuff in there too, including a feature on Audio Visuals, the seminal high-quality fan-produced audio series of the 80s and 90s. Nice! doctorwhomagazine.com Continue reading Doctor Who Magazine Special: The World of Fandom

Adult Situations: Is New Who More Grown-Up Than the Classic Series?

It’s often stated that one of the areas in which the modern version of Doctor Who succeeds over the classic series is that it is more grown up. But is it really? Could it be that two eras of Doctor Who simply wear their maturity in different ways and approach the issue of what it means to be an adult from completely different angles, informed by the society in which they were shaped? The aspects of the modern series that people label as more sophisticated are mostly emotional. The classic series rarely dwelt on open displays of emotion – unless, … Continue reading Adult Situations: Is New Who More Grown-Up Than the Classic Series?